Peter F. Drucker – The Effective Executive

Why did I choose to read the book?

When starting to write this blog, and wanting to write about books which I have read, why not start with the basics and a business book, more often than not, placed in must read or top business book lists. Also, the book has repeatedly been detailed as essential reading by Jeff Bezos, head and founder of Amazon.com, for whom I hold great respect.

What is it about?

The effective executive by Peter F. Drucker, originally  written in 1967, has often been named a basic and must read book for managers and executives alike. It explains the principles of management as defined by Drucker.
In essence, the book elaborates on the following:
  • What is effectiveness?
  • Why must an executive be effective?
  • How can effectiveness be achieved?
All these point are explained in detail with many examples and advice or lessons of how to learn and internalize the steps to reach effectiveness. The books main emphasis is on how effectiveness can be achieved and explains this in great detail, with a lot of examples and recommendations on how daily routines should be managed and on what the executive should focus.

How did I like the book?

Why the book has been named as essential reading in so many places makes total sense to me. It is very easy to understand and entertaining, but at the same time very dense in content. Drucker has included several examples to each point being made, and summarizes the main points very well. Though some aspects of the book show their age (written in 1967, before the Internet and Email was a thing) and the author’ views on American politics can be distraction at times, the key aspects of what executives are and should be (doing) remain relevant today. Also, because of it’s density and scope, I will likely reread this book at a later date, as I can see a lot of points given by Drucker, which are not yet relevant to me, but will likely be in the future, depending of job context. Overall, short and easy to understand book, which every top and bottom executive should have read at least once.