Seth Godin – We Are All Weird

Why did I choose to read the book?

After having read All Marketeers are Liars, which I liked quite a bit, another of Godin’s books was in order.

What is it about?

Godin proclaims the end of mass marketing. Mass marketing is no more, the times when buying TV ads and billboards was enough, is over. The internet has splintered consumer groups into tribes, each with their own interests and abundance of living necessities has made the developed world rich, which means, people have all they need and now buy stuff they want, which is often quite weird. This has led to individualistic interests and thereby products, not covered my mass production and catered to fans / fanatics / individualists / the weird may it be old-school iPad compatible typewriters or audio cable covered in gold. Godin explains his concept of weird marketing and how to turn these tribes into customers.

How did I like the book?

Quite fun. Godin is again proving to be a master storyteller, which made the book an easy and quick read. While the books content in my opinion, holds true and was presented clever enough, I also felt it to be a bit esoteric. I wholeheartedly agree on his assessment, that the internet has splintered interest groups into tribes (some small, some big) I am not sure whether businesses focusing on these (often volatile) tribes can be profitable for long, then again, I have seen some strive in their respective niches. Quite interesting food for thought for sure.

Seth Godin – All marketers are liars

Why did I choose to read the book?

Godin’s bestseller has been on my to-do list for quite some time, as I have read a lot of good things about this book, some even claiming it to single-handedly having modernized marketing.

What is it about?

As Godin explains it, Marketers aren’t liars. They are storytellers. In today’s world, where mass marketing and ever bigger budgets do not heed the wanted result, it is time to rethink marketing. Don’t sell the facts, sell a story. Best yet, provide a frame and let people tell the story themselves. Godin explains what makes a great storyteller and how setting the right frame for the right audience can lead to great success.

 

How did I like the book?

Godin is a storyteller, therefore this book is extremely well written. I am also inclined to agree on pretty much everything in this book, I was either manipulated by a grandmaster or Godin’s insight simply rings true. Everyone interested in persuading via storytelling, modern marketing or simply how modern marketing and existing preconceptions shape our way of interacting with the market, should definitely take a look.

Dona M. Wong – WSJ Guide to Information Graphics

Why did I choose to read the book?

On my job as strategy and sales controller, I created a lot of reports and visualized lots of data, especially when I first created our controlling cockpit. Since its inception, it’s design always bugged me. Concept and information were well thought through, but if I had the chance to redo, I would like to do it differently. But how exactly? How do I make the graphs easier to understand? How do I get the point across, in a better, more self explanatory way? These questions fueled my desire to learn more, hence, the need to read up.

What is it about?

The sub-title pretty much explains it all: “The dos and don’ts of presenting data, facts, and figures”. The book includes examples of how to visualize data, what colours to use, how to stylize text via fonts and what to avoid. It shows common design mistakes and how to avoid them, while also showing haw to visualize different kinds of data properly.

How did I like the book?

Very informative and does what it promises quite well. After just a couple of pages, some pages about the usage of colour to be precise, I already found a lot of what I was looking for. I did not expect colour, especially its sparse use (less is more), to make that much of a difference in reporting and data visualization. Overall this book is great, what I missed though was some kind of narrative or course, which I though the word guide implied. To me, this is not a book to read from start to finish, but a nice book for quick reference, and as a reference book, it’s perfect.